Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce at vulputate nibh. Phasellus rhoncus ac augue dignissim tincidunt. Nam euismod ante id dictum rhoncus. In accumsan turpis eu turpis tempor, a aliquam felis semper. Cras varius non ante et tincidunt. Cras faucibus, justo non varius tincidunt, est erat facilisis erat, non pretium elit mauris facilisis tellus. Duis lacinia nisl vel libero auctor, vel tempor elit aliquet. Maecenas laoreet at erat quis euismod. Morbi in posuere mi. Nullam pellentesque tortor sed interdum elementum. Donec maximus eros fringilla eleifend mattis. Sed fringilla est a aliquam rhoncus. Aenean arcu diam, porta in augue nec, auctor gravida arcu.

Integer et mattis sapien, eu tincidunt leo. Integer et ligula in felis ullamcorper pretium in non lacus. Duis vitae felis in arcu eleifend ultrices vel vel erat. Nulla sit amet varius lectus, vitae imperdiet ex. Phasellus sit amet est sit amet sem accumsan condimentum id a risus. Praesent mauris velit, volutpat sit amet mattis vel, vulputate id metus. Proin aliquet ex id urna dapibus posuere. Donec eget eleifend dolor, malesuada ullamcorper eros. Cras sollicitudin fringilla libero, sit amet semper turpis semper quis. Fusce id enim molestie, vulputate metus a, iaculis libero. Sed nisi diam, euismod in quam vel, pharetra semper ex. Curabitur gravida, lectus vitae venenatis lobortis, diam leo finibus dui, eget maximus leo felis vitae orci. In semper mi eget libero pulvinar, eget facilisis libero finibus. Nam aliquam convallis dolor. Suspendisse posuere, erat sit amet sollicitudin pellentesque, est justo ornare nisi, quis aliquet ante augue at nunc. Morbi porta consequat justo, sit amet iaculis nisi semper at.

Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Section 1

Making Strides Through 30 Years of Meaningful Work

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce at vulputate nibh. Phasellus rhoncus ac augue dignissim tincidunt. Nam euismod ante id dictum rhoncus. In accumsan turpis eu turpis tempor, a aliquam felis semper. Cras varius non ante et tincidunt. Cras faucibus, justo non varius tincidunt, est erat facilisis erat, non pretium elit mauris facilisis tellus. Duis lacinia nisl vel libero auctor, vel tempor elit aliquet. Maecenas laoreet at erat quis euismod. Morbi in posuere mi. Nullam pellentesque tortor sed interdum elementum. Donec maximus eros fringilla eleifend mattis. Sed fringilla est a aliquam rhoncus. Aenean arcu diam, porta in augue nec, auctor gravida arcu.

Integer et mattis sapien, eu tincidunt leo. Integer et ligula in felis ullamcorper pretium in non lacus. Duis vitae felis in arcu eleifend ultrices vel vel erat. Nulla sit amet varius lectus, vitae imperdiet ex. Phasellus sit amet est sit amet sem accumsan condimentum id a risus. Praesent mauris velit, volutpat sit amet mattis vel, vulputate id metus. Proin aliquet ex id urna dapibus posuere. Donec eget eleifend dolor, malesuada ullamcorper eros. Cras sollicitudin fringilla libero, sit amet semper turpis semper quis. Fusce id enim molestie, vulputate metus a, iaculis libero. Sed nisi diam, euismod in quam vel, pharetra semper ex. Curabitur gravida, lectus vitae venenatis lobortis, diam leo finibus dui, eget maximus leo felis vitae orci. In semper mi eget libero pulvinar, eget facilisis libero finibus. Nam aliquam convallis dolor. Suspendisse posuere, erat sit amet sollicitudin pellentesque, est justo ornare nisi, quis aliquet ante augue at nunc. Morbi porta consequat justo, sit amet iaculis nisi semper at.

Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Children Living in Poverty

Households With Children Living In Poverty
2001 - 2019
2001
407,590
2019
479,379
Increase of 0

Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, the number of children living in poverty was on the decline in Georgia. In 2019, 19.5% of children were living in poverty. Though still startlingly high and above the national rate of 17%, Georgia’s rate had not been that low since 2004, prior to the onset of the Great Recession in 2007.

Georgia KIDS COUNT started tracking the current indicator for children living in poverty in 2001. Our rate reached a peak in 2012 when 27.3%—more than 1 in 4—of Georgia’s children were living in poverty. That percentage declined steadily every year from 2012 through 2019.

Another economic indicator that had a positive trend in Georgia prior to 2020 was our state’s unemployment rate. Capping out at 10.5% in 2010, Georgia’s percentage of unemployment was 3.4 in 2019 prior to the pandemic—the lowest it had been since the trendline for that KIDS COUNT indicator began in 2000.

Even with low unemployment, however, working Georgians struggle to make ends meet, and the COVID-19 crisis has threatened to derail the progress our state has made on economic outcomes since March 2020. According to a U.S. Census Bureau Household Pulse Survey conducted from Feb. 17 – March 15, 2021—approximately one year after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in Georgia—18% of Georgia’s households with children reported that they “sometimes or often” didn’t have enough food to eat, and 22% had “little or no confidence” in their ability to pay their rent or mortgage on time.

It remains to be seen how the pandemic and the responses of our public and private institutions will affect economic outcomes for Georgia’s children. New data that will reveal the rate of children living in poverty during the pandemic, as well as a more recent unemployment rate, won’t be available until later in 2022. Illness, inconsistent access to childcare, and other pandemic-related issues that disrupt our state’s workforce and the prosperity of families continue to evolve and present challenges as the virus lingers. Beyond that, policy decisions made during and after the pandemic have the potential to greatly affect the economic well-being of all children and families.

To continue the positive economic trends for our state, we must persist. We must keep a focus on the well-being of our most vulnerable Georgians and the conditions they face. Doing so will give us the best opportunity to continue making gains despite the volatile nature of the pandemic and any circumstances our state and nation encounter in the future.

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Adult Educational Attainment

Higher levels of education and income tend to correlate with better outcomes for children, families, and communities. So, it’s promising for the future of our state that 87.1% of adults in Georgia held at least a high school diploma and 31.3% held a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2019—the highest percentage for both indicators in a decade. Both measures of adult educational attainment also have shown a steady increase since 2009.

Prior to the pandemic, Georgians’ increased levels of education were already paying off in the form of secure jobs. In addition to record-low unemployment rates in 2019 (3.4%), the number of Georgia’s children whose parents lacked secure employment reached 7.7%, its lowest point since 2009. Georgia’s families with children were faring far better in this well-being indicator than the national average of 26%.

This bodes well for Georgia’s future, especially since the number of available jobs requiring postsecondary training or education in our state continues to increase. According to the Georgia Chamber of Commerce, 60% of Georgia’s jobs of the future will require postsecondary certification or degrees. However, COVID-19 has disrupted pre-pandemic trends, and it will likely be several years before we know the full extent of how Georgia’s employment opportunities and workforce has been—and will continue to be—affected.

We’re aware of some shifts. Older Georgians have expedited retirement plans, younger generations have seized additional or new training opportunities to pursue different and often higher-skilled jobs, and wages have risen for workers in some service jobs. With these changes come both challenges and opportunities. It’s up to all of us to advocate for changes that benefit Georgia’s children and families, while stepping up to address obstacles placed in our collective path to post-pandemic prosperity.

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Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Section 2

Getting Unstuck – Change is Possible

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque hendrerit sed urna hendrerit auctor. Phasellus venenatis metus tortor, eget semper justo rhoncus eu. Etiam nec est urna. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nullam ipsum lorem, faucibus vel eleifend nec, blandit a lorem. Fusce non massa ante. Suspendisse id justo sed dolor feugiat dictum. Donec a condimentum augue, blandit sodales orci. In odio metus, sollicitudin ac aliquam feugiat, bibendum id libero. Donec eu tortor ligula.

Nullam id pretium diam. Suspendisse sollicitudin risus vitae leo fermentum, sit amet condimentum eros lobortis. Nunc mattis congue nibh in vehicula. Cras id diam luctus, varius quam sit amet, luctus eros. Integer sapien est, ultricies ut ullamcorper quis, efficitur non magna. Etiam ac nibh est. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Mauris feugiat ligula sed dolor consectetur sollicitudin. Cras rhoncus, ipsum vitae congue lobortis, est nisl iaculis mi, sed sodales nunc est id dui. Maecenas suscipit vitae quam ut facilisis.

Nam mollis turpis at semper consequat. Etiam dictum est ac est commodo, nec pulvinar libero bibendum. Mauris elementum gravida laoreet. Nullam faucibus eleifend sem, in sodales mi finibus tempus. Nulla sollicitudin a est vitae suscipit. Aenean mollis placerat lacus.

Maternal Health and Education and Infant Health Outcomes

Babies With Low Birthweights in Georgia
1990 - 2019
1990
9747
2019
12655
Increase of 0

Georgia has seen its highest-ever levels of maternal education in recent years. Only 12.6% of babies were born to mothers with less than 12 years of education in 2019—the lowest rate since Georgia KIDS COUNT began tracking the trend line in 1994. Similarly, the number of mothers who had their first birth at age 20 or older and with 12 years of education jumped significantly from 71% in 2010 to 82.9% in 2019.

Even while their households are experiencing higher levels of education and the corresponding improved economic prospects, mothers and babies in our state often are still experiencing poor health outcomes. This bucks the general tenet that higher levels of education correspond with better overall outcomes and reveals that some Georgians still don’t have access to all the resources and supports they need to thrive.

The number of low birthweight (LBW) babies being born in our state has remained stubbornly high, reaching a 25-year peak in 2018 at 10.1% with a nominal improvement in 2019 to 10%. Even as it plateaued, the Georgia rate hovered above the national average of 8.3% in 2018 and 2019—and the United States’ rates historically have been high compared to other developed nations.

The pandemic has laid bare the shortcomings of our health care system and the lack of access to healthy foods, medical insurance, mental health services, medical providers for some residents, and other resources and services that enable all Georgians to stay healthy. LBW is one early and telling indicator that women and children aren’t getting everything they need to thrive, linking to a larger picture of community health. Because of Georgia’s historically high LBW rates, it’s vital that we continue tracking this measure of maternal and infant health. While a greater awareness of the health care system’s shortcomings gathers momentum due to the pandemic, we can also open the door to crucial conversations about lack of care for mothers.

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Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Reading Proficiency

Low achievement in reading affects our economy, our safety, and our health. Third grade reading achievement is a consequential milestone that gives us a peek into children’s futures—their probable well-being, success, and participation in civic life—in the short and long term.

Leading experts and decision-makers from public health, child welfare, education, state and local government, business, law, and other sectors have embraced and collectively undertaken efforts to improve Georgia’s third and fourth grade reading scores.

What is startling given this collective effort is that, prior to the pandemic, Georgia’s recent gains appeared to be slowing down. In 2019, the most recent year of data we have available, 68% of fourth graders scored below proficient in reading—3% worse than in 2017. Though an improvement from the early 2000s when 74% of Georgia’s fourth graders scored below proficient, the significant implications for this indicator require us to demand better for our children.





Disruptions caused by a lingering pandemic are complicating the issue, as well as limiting data that help us understand the problem and guide us toward solutions. These interruptions to learning have not only affected K-12 students, but also our youngest children embarking on the path to reading proficiency.

We’ve known for years the significance of third grade reading proficiency as a measure and predictor of future success. Fortunately, we’ve also studied and know how to improve literacy outcomes. Our next chapter in this work must be to intensify our focus, investment, commitment, and innovation, acknowledging that maintaining a long-term, systems-change approach will be a challenge that’s well worth the effort.

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Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Youth Development and Success

We’ve made great strides in our high school graduation rate in recent years. In 2020, 83.8% of Georgia’s students graduated on time, compared with 67.5% in 2011. Still, our youth too often face significant barriers to success, including challenges related to poverty and physical or mental health.

According to the FY21 Georgia Student Health Survey, 36,840 students in grades 6-12 reported being bullied at least once within the past 30 days. In 2019, 278 Georgians aged 15 – 19 died by homicide, suicide, or accident. Additionally, we have much work to do to reconnect and reengage the nearly 8% of teens in our communities who aren’t in school and aren’t working.

Because the reasons students leave school are varied, the methods to support them need to also be wide-ranging. Evidence-based strategies support opportunities for youth and keep them engaged in their education. We must bring together cross-sector partners at the local level to develop tailored strategies while continuously evaluating goals related to policies, procedures, and systems that affect learners. Empowering community is another key component of school success.

Helping teens stay engaged increases their chances for success. Research shows that civic engagement is related to improved public health outcomes, including mental health, economic resilience, low unemployment, and lower violent crime rates. These positive outcomes, according to the 2019 Georgia Civic Health Index, have been found in both adults and adolescents. Graduating from high school on time generally leads to better health, higher income, and a lower likelihood of involvement with the criminal justice system.

While focusing on providing children with a healthy start and access to high-quality learning opportunities from a young age is critical, implementing key interventions and strategies for older children who didn’t have those early advantages can help them reach their full potential and become productive, engaged adults and community members.

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Cras semper diam non diam sodales, non interdum eros vestibulum. Integer egestas vehicula ultrices. Maecenas sodales est vitae felis fermentum porta. Nullam ultricies velit mi, hendrerit feugiat eros vestibulum in. Suspendisse in mollis eros, nec ultricies nibh. Sed.

Section 3

Getting Unstuck – Change is Possible

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque hendrerit sed urna hendrerit auctor. Phasellus venenatis metus tortor, eget semper justo rhoncus eu. Etiam nec est urna. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nullam ipsum lorem, faucibus vel eleifend nec, blandit a lorem. Fusce non massa ante. Suspendisse id justo sed dolor feugiat dictum. Donec a condimentum augue, blandit sodales orci. In odio metus, sollicitudin ac aliquam feugiat, bibendum id libero. Donec eu tortor ligula.

Nullam id pretium diam. Suspendisse sollicitudin risus vitae leo fermentum, sit amet condimentum eros lobortis. Nunc mattis congue nibh in vehicula. Cras id diam luctus, varius quam sit amet, luctus eros. Integer sapien est, ultricies ut ullamcorper quis, efficitur non magna. Etiam ac nibh est. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Mauris feugiat ligula sed dolor consectetur sollicitudin. Cras rhoncus, ipsum vitae congue lobortis, est nisl iaculis mi, sed sodales nunc est id dui. Maecenas suscipit vitae quam ut facilisis.

Nam mollis turpis at semper consequat. Etiam dictum est ac est commodo, nec pulvinar libero bibendum. Mauris elementum gravida laoreet. Nullam faucibus eleifend sem, in sodales mi finibus tempus. Nulla sollicitudin a est vitae suscipit. Aenean mollis placerat lacus.

Trauma and Mental and Emotional Health

Mental health—specifically access to high-quality mental health services—has long been a concern throughout the United States. Georgia is ranked in the top five states with the biggest mental health provider shortages according to a 2020 report.

The pandemic is exacerbating mental health challenges and increasing the need for services in Georgia and across the nation. Isolation and uncertainty have led to greater anxiety, substance abuse, and depression among Georgians. Close to half (44.3%) of our state’s adults reported symptoms of anxiety or depression in February 2021.

Georgia’s children aren’t immune to mental health disorders, and they’re lacking care as well. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 104,000 of Georgia’s children ages 12 – 17 have depression. As of February 2021—at the height of the pandemic—68.4% of those children hadn’t received care in the previous year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 70% of youth across the nation involved with the juvenile justice system have a mental health condition, compared with 20% in the general child population ages 3 – 17 who have a diagnosable mental health disorder. This demonstrates the reality of what happens when children aren’t provided access to treatment and supports.

Research tells us that being exposed to certain stressors and trauma in childhood—Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)—can lead to mental health challenges down the road. While three in five Georgians have reported at least one ACE, support for children and adults who have experienced trauma and resulting mental health challenges can be difficult to access. Nearly 30% of Georgia’s adults were unable to get counseling or therapy when they needed it, according to NAMI. Plus, according to Voices for Georgia’s Children citing the CDC, 78 counties don’t have a licensed psychologist, 53 don’t have a licensed social worker, and 45 don’t have either type of professional located in the community.

Mental health is a tough issue to tackle. Many are hesitant to seek help or discuss the issue because of a perceived or actual stigma attached, and there is a dearth of data that could help us understand the nuances of the issue and develop solutions at the individual and system levels.





Mental health is health. In order to have healthy economies and healthy communities, we must have healthy people. Therefore, using both prevention and treatment strategies to tackle head-on the mental health challenges our state is facing will be critical for our collective, future success.

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Race, Equity, and Inclusion

If we expect to help all Georgians thrive, we must acknowledge where there are disparities across demographics, and we must do more than close gaps and point to disparities. Our work must strive to achieve equity, a state in which all have the same opportunity to reach their potential. By focusing on equity, we can ensure fair treatment, opportunity, and access to resources; create a culture of respect and understanding; build a culture of belonging; and enhance engagement.

When we disaggregate Georgia’s well-being indicators by race and ethnicity, we can clearly see persistent disparities and inequities between people of color and white people. For example, when we look at Georgia’s LBW data disaggregated by race, we learn that Georgia’s non-Hispanic black mothers and babies are in even greater peril than the general population. 14.7% of black babies weighed below the 5.5-pound threshold at birth in 2019, compared with the overall Georgia rate of 10%, and 7.2% for white babies.

Similarly, Georgia’s poverty rate is approximately triple for black (31.3%), Hispanic or Latino (31.9%), and American Indian (33.5%) children when compared to white (11.5%) and Asian (10.2%) children. Homeownership—a key component of wealth-building—also varies significantly by race and ethnicity in Georgia. As of 2019, 74% of white households were owner-occupied, compared with 65% of Asian, 48% of Hispanic or Latino, and 47% of black or African American households.

Race plays a defining role in Georgians’ life trajectory and outcomes. A complex system of racial biases and inequities is deeply rooted in our country’s—and state’s—history, culture, and institutions. These disparities present us with tremendous opportunity to clear a path for all Georgians to reach their full potential. To do that we must clearly understand, challenge, and transform this system of racialization, which routinely confers advantage and disadvantage based on skin color and other characteristics.
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has outlined seven steps to ensure that we’re creating equitable opportunities for the populations we serve:

  • Establish an understanding of race, equity, and inclusion principles
  • Engage affected populations and stakeholders
  • Gather and analyze disaggregated data
  • Conduct systems analysis of root causes of inequities
  • Identify strategies and target resources to address root causes of inequities
  • Conduct race equity impact assessment for all policies and decision-making
  • Continuously evaluate effectiveness and adapt strategies

By targeting and implementing strategies that will improve conditions for our most vulnerable residents, and by transforming systems that are preventing progress for all of us, we can learn how to improve outcomes for everyone and leap toward our vision of an enduring, healthy, and prosperous Georgia.

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Section 4

Conclusion

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque hendrerit sed urna hendrerit auctor. Phasellus venenatis metus tortor, eget semper justo rhoncus eu. Etiam nec est urna. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nullam ipsum lorem, faucibus vel eleifend nec, blandit a lorem. Fusce non massa ante. Suspendisse id justo sed dolor feugiat dictum. Donec a condimentum augue, blandit sodales orci. In odio metus, sollicitudin ac aliquam feugiat, bibendum id libero. Donec eu tortor ligula.

Nullam id pretium diam. Suspendisse sollicitudin risus vitae leo fermentum, sit amet condimentum eros lobortis. Nunc mattis congue nibh in vehicula. Cras id diam luctus, varius quam sit amet, luctus eros. Integer sapien est, ultricies ut ullamcorper quis, efficitur non magna. Etiam ac nibh est. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Mauris feugiat ligula sed dolor consectetur sollicitudin. Cras rhoncus, ipsum vitae congue lobortis, est nisl iaculis mi, sed sodales nunc est id dui. Maecenas suscipit vitae quam ut facilisis.

Nam mollis turpis at semper consequat. Etiam dictum est ac est commodo, nec pulvinar libero bibendum. Mauris elementum gravida laoreet. Nullam faucibus eleifend sem, in sodales mi finibus tempus. Nulla sollicitudin a est vitae suscipit. Aenean mollis placerat lacus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce at vulputate nibh. Phasellus rhoncus ac augue dignissim tincidunt. Nam euismod ante id dictum rhoncus. In accumsan turpis eu turpis tempor, a aliquam felis semper. Cras varius non ante et tincidunt. Cras faucibus, justo non varius tincidunt, est erat facilisis erat, non pretium elit mauris facilisis tellus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce at vulputate nibh. Phasellus rhoncus ac augue dignissim tincidunt. Nam euismod ante id dictum rhoncus. In accumsan turpis eu turpis tempor, a aliquam felis semper. Cras varius non ante et tincidunt. Cras faucibus, justo non varius tincidunt, est erat facilisis erat, non pretium elit mauris facilisis tellus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce at vulputate nibh. Phasellus rhoncus ac augue dignissim tincidunt. Nam euismod ante id dictum rhoncus. In accumsan turpis eu turpis tempor, a aliquam felis semper. Cras varius non ante et tincidunt. Cras faucibus, justo non varius tincidunt, est erat facilisis erat, non pretium elit mauris facilisis tellus.

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